Camping On The John Day River

7 Campgrounds for Solitude in Eastern Oregon – Travel Oregon

Oregon’s John Day River is the longest free-flowing river west of the Rockies. Its lower reaches, which flow through some of the most stunning river canyons in the West, are designated Wild and Scenic for 147 miles. The river is a stronghold for summer steelhead and spring Chinook salmon and is home to the largest herd of California bighorn sheep in Oregon.

Camping On The John Day River
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Jul 26, 2023Is Camping Allowed within John Day Fossil Beds National Monument? No. While camping is not allowed within the three units of the monument, there are many nearby campgrounds. Some have full service amenities, some are quiet and remote, some are in the forest, and some are right on the John Day River. Dispersed Camping Information

Raft the Wild and Scenic John Day River: A High Desert Adventure through  the Columbia Plateau, Oregon | Sierra Club Outings
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John Day River (Service Creek → Cottonwood) | akMOUNTAIN.com The iconic John Day River is a long, remote, natural river system, with 252 free-flowing miles. The lower John Day River offers one of the best spring and fall wild steelhead runs in Northeast Oregon. Anglers also come for catfish and smallmouth bass. J.S. Burres, across the river, is a popular boat launch for rafts, kayaks, canoes and drift boats.

6 Easy Overnight River Rafting Trips in the Western US
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Camping On The John Day River

The iconic John Day River is a long, remote, natural river system, with 252 free-flowing miles. The lower John Day River offers one of the best spring and fall wild steelhead runs in Northeast Oregon. Anglers also come for catfish and smallmouth bass. J.S. Burres, across the river, is a popular boat launch for rafts, kayaks, canoes and drift boats. This campground sits along the Wild and Scenic North Fork John Day River at the junction of the Blue Mountain and Elkhorn Scenic Byways. It features 20 campsites, 3 accessible toilet facilities, and stock handling facilities. There is no potable water or garbage service, so please pack your garbage home.

6 Easy Overnight River Rafting Trips in the Western US

Not to be confused with Lone Pine Campground in Cottonwood Canyon State Park, Oregon’s second largest state park, the John Day River’s Lone Pine Recreation Site is located over 100 miles upstream, just northeast of Kimberly, Oregon. Lone Pine’s name aptly conjures images of the barren landscape synonymous with the John Day River. John Day River: Clarno to Cottonwood Bridge | Outdoor Project

John Day River: Clarno to Cottonwood Bridge | Outdoor Project
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John Day River: Service Creek to Clarno | Outdoor Project Not to be confused with Lone Pine Campground in Cottonwood Canyon State Park, Oregon’s second largest state park, the John Day River’s Lone Pine Recreation Site is located over 100 miles upstream, just northeast of Kimberly, Oregon. Lone Pine’s name aptly conjures images of the barren landscape synonymous with the John Day River.

John Day River: Service Creek to Clarno | Outdoor Project
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7 Campgrounds for Solitude in Eastern Oregon – Travel Oregon John Day River camping. Camping on the John Day River is dispersed and first-come, first-served. If you start at Service Creek, camping at Cathedral Rock is a must. The wide-based basalt tower climbs to a point and resembles an old-world basilica. An easy walk to the top from camp is a fun evening adventure.

7 Campgrounds for Solitude in Eastern Oregon - Travel Oregon
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John Day River (Service Creek → Cottonwood) | akMOUNTAIN.com Jul 26, 2023Is Camping Allowed within John Day Fossil Beds National Monument? No. While camping is not allowed within the three units of the monument, there are many nearby campgrounds. Some have full service amenities, some are quiet and remote, some are in the forest, and some are right on the John Day River. Dispersed Camping Information

John Day River (Service Creek → Cottonwood) | akMOUNTAIN.com
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John Day River Rafting Trips with Ouzel Outfitters 1,250foot deep scenic canyon. Wildlife viewing. Cons Summer heat and lack of shade. Features Wildlife Wildlife Bird watching Big Game Watching Big vistas Fishing

John Day River Rafting Trips with Ouzel Outfitters
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Darling River campground – Menindee | VisitNSW.com The iconic John Day River is a long, remote, natural river system, with 252 free-flowing miles. The lower John Day River offers one of the best spring and fall wild steelhead runs in Northeast Oregon. Anglers also come for catfish and smallmouth bass. J.S. Burres, across the river, is a popular boat launch for rafts, kayaks, canoes and drift boats.

Darling River campground - Menindee | VisitNSW.com
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John Day River: Thirty Mile Creek to Cottonwood Bridge This campground sits along the Wild and Scenic North Fork John Day River at the junction of the Blue Mountain and Elkhorn Scenic Byways. It features 20 campsites, 3 accessible toilet facilities, and stock handling facilities. There is no potable water or garbage service, so please pack your garbage home.

John Day River: Thirty Mile Creek to Cottonwood Bridge
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John Day River: Service Creek to Clarno | Outdoor Project

John Day River: Thirty Mile Creek to Cottonwood Bridge Oregon’s John Day River is the longest free-flowing river west of the Rockies. Its lower reaches, which flow through some of the most stunning river canyons in the West, are designated Wild and Scenic for 147 miles. The river is a stronghold for summer steelhead and spring Chinook salmon and is home to the largest herd of California bighorn sheep in Oregon.

John Day River (Service Creek → Cottonwood) | akMOUNTAIN.com Darling River campground – Menindee | VisitNSW.com 1,250foot deep scenic canyon. Wildlife viewing. Cons Summer heat and lack of shade. Features Wildlife Wildlife Bird watching Big Game Watching Big vistas Fishing

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